ADVENTUROUS ACTIVITIES

Croeso

Welcome! Often the first activity when the group arrive this is a mixture of ‘ice breaker’ activities which gives the instructors and the students a chance to get to know each other, some team challenges, and a local walk to meet the local wildlife and to reflect on how it is different to where the students have come from.

Croeso – Curriculum
English – spoken language, give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Maths – number – space and place value, read Roman numerals to 1000 (M) and recognise years written in Roman numerals (sundial). Measurement – convert between different units of metric measure (for example, kilometre and metre; centimetre and metre; centimetre and millimetre; gram and kilogram; litre and millilitre), convert between miles and kilometres. Understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints.
Science living things and their habitats – describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird, describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals. Earth and Space – describe the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system, describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth, describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies. Use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky. Animals including humans – recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function. Evolution and inheritance – identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution. Light – use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.
Art & Design – Pupils should be taught: about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Geography – Pupils should be taught to: name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns, and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time; describe and understand key aspects of: physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle; human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water, use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
History – Pupils should be taught about: changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team
Canoeing and kayaking

Primary groups usually use canoes on the Brecon-Monmouthshire canal for  a half day session. During the session students will learn some of the skills required to manoeuvre their canoe before setting off on a journey or taking part in some challenging games.

The canoes (also called open or Canadian canoes) are typically paddled by a team of two people using paddles with a blade on one end.

Kayaks are typically paddled solo with a paddle that has a blade on both ends.
Although stable the students enthusiasm may cause the canoe to capsize. All paddlers, whether they can swim or not, are equipped with safety equipment such as buoyancy aids and other items such as helmets are issued as required. The canal is shallow and the water is fed from the River Usk, one of the cleanest rivers in Britain (as the otters and salmon will testify).

In calm conditions alternatives include venturing onto open water at Keepers Pond, Llangorse lake or one of the larger reservoirs in the National Park, or undertaking a journey on the canal which links in with another activity such as a walk or bushcraft.

Canoeing and Kayaking – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Science – Forces: identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction that act between moving surfaces.Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.
Geography – Human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.
History – a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team.
Rock climbing and abseiling

Primary groups use the on-site bouldering wall and tower for a half day session. During the climbing session pupils will learn about the equipment they will use to safeguard each other and learn about trust, responsibilities, and how to encourage each other as they attempt to reach the top of the various climbs.

Rock climbing and Abseiling – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Science – Forces: explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object; recognise that some mechanisms, including levers, pulleys and gears, allow a smaller force to have a greater effect. Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team.
Caving  and River Study

Caving with primary groups is incorporated into the river study day:

River Study  A popular day for schools due to the variety of activities and the mix of environmental education and adventure. The primary River Study day includes a visit to the cave of Porth yr Ogof.  There will be a briefing at Pendarren which includes the water and rock cycles, and then group will investigate the river Mellte to see how it changes as it flows down the mountain. They will see geographical river features they have learned about such as meanders, erosion, tributaries. After lunch they will follow the river into the cave Porth yr Ogof and explore the underground passages, see the fossils of creatures that were alive before the dinosaurs and have an opportunity to experience total darkness. From there they will move downstream to where the river tumbles over a large waterfall and have yet another opportunity to get wet.

 

As with all studies Pendarren House is open to ideas from visiting teachers if they would like to modify the activity:

  • Geography and Science focus – this is the day we have run for many years, bringing the water cycle to life, using theories and predictions then testing them, experiencing real geology and geography.
  • Maths focus – using the river environment to collect real data to use back in the classroom at school or Pendarren.
  • Adventure focus – experiencing and exploring the cave for longer to develop their adventurous side finishing with the waterfall experience.

Caving

Following changes to the National Curriculum some schools have asked to miss out the initial briefing at Pendarren and focus on the adventure. Hence there is a Caving option as well as River Study. The caving option will have a stronger focus on adventure and personal development and students will spend longer in the cave.

River Study- Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Maths – Statistics: solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line graph; complete, read and interpret information in tables, including timetables: interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems calculate and interpret the mean as an average.
Science – Properties and changes to materials: compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets; know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution; use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating; give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic; demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes; explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda.
Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function. Evolution and inheritance: recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago.
GeographyLocational knowledge: name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.
Physical geography: describe and understand key aspects of: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle. Geographical skills and fieldwork: use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.
PE- take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team
Mountain walks

The Brecon Beacons National Park was created to protect the mountain scenery, and we are ideally positioned to explore this National Park. Our local hills include Sugarloaf, Table Mountain, Blorenge and Skirrid – the pupils get a great sense of achievement no matter which one they climb.

They will travel through woodland, farmland and over mountain and moorland seeing springs, streams, rivers, wildlife and plenty of sheep (in summer anyway). There are opportunities for simple map reading/ route finding, and learning opportunities in geography (e.g. land use, geology), science (e.g. habitats, rocks) and history (old hill forts and changing ways of life).

Primary students usually undertake a local half day walk, but a full day is an option.

Mountain Walk – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Maths – Measurement: convert between different units of metric measure (for example, kilometre and metre; centimetre and metre; centimetre and millimetre; gram and kilogram; litre and millilitre): convert between miles and kilometres: understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints (distances greater than metres are difficult in school, so ideas of kilometre and miles to see etc).
Science – Working scientifically: taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate. Living things and their habitats: describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals. Animals including human: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function. Evolution and inheritance: identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.
Light: use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.
Art & Design – Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.
Geography – Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics: key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time; describe and understand key aspects of:Physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle; human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water; use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world; use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.
History – Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age; the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain, Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots; the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor; a local history study.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team.
Adventure Journey

Leaving the footpaths we head off into the forest following the stream wherever it takes us.  You will get wet! For primary students the venues used are typically those with shallow water.

Adventure Journey – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Science – Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.
PE – Take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team.

 

Time Travellers – Stone Age to 1066

Bring history back to life! Using a walk from Pendarren , up Table Mountain, through Llanbedr and back to Pendarren to illustrate a Historical Timeline from 12,000 BC through the Stone Age; Bronze Age; Iron Age; Romans; Anglo Saxons; Vikings to 1066 and Edward the Confessor and the Norman Invasion.

This will be delivered using the local environment and historical features, local stories and legends as well as artefacts and role play.

It will allow the students to physically walk through the history curriculum of Key Stages 1 and 2 and feel some of the emotions associated with the time periods.

Time Travellers – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
History – a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team

 

Orienteering 

Use your brain and your legs to navigate your way around the course. We have a variety of courses to suit all abilities: in the garden, the Pendarren Park for those who have mastered the art of navigating, and indoors for the wet evenings. The students can also use GPS units which adds another dimension to the activity, as used in geocaching (we have geocache courses too, both on and off site).

Orienteering – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Maths – Measurement: use all four operations to solve problems involving measure [for example, length, mass, volume, money] using decimal notation, including scaling.
Science – Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.
Geography – use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team.
High Ropes 

The high ropes tower has six challenges and is used for half day sessions: two Traverses, All Aboard, Leap of Faith, Jacobs Ladder, Crate Stack. Students will take turns to undertake the challenges in small groups whilst their classmates hold the ropes.

High Ropes – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Science – Forces: explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object; recognise that some mechanisms, including levers, pulleys and gears, allow a smaller force to have a greater effect. Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team.
Bushcraft 

Build your own shelter, light a fire without matches, discover wild food, learn how to safely use a knife, toast a marshmallow. A half day session.

Bushcraft – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Science – Properties and changes of materials: compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets; explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning.Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.
Design & Technology – Design: use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups; generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.Make: select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately; select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.Evaluate: investigate and analyse a range of existing products; evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.Technical knowledge: apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.Cooking and nutrition: prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques, understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.
Geography – human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.
History – changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team
Pony trekking/Horse riding

Pony trekking can be arranged through another provider, there is an extra charge for this. Over the 2 hour session students are shown how to care for and prepare their pony, and how to control their pony. The stables has an indoor and outdoor arena where the students can practise before heading out for a short ride on the common.

Pony Trekking – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team.
Camping

Pendarren is well resourced to offer a camping experience overnight in the grounds.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES and VISITS

Big Pit coal mine museum

This closed as a working deep mine in 1981 and reopened as a tourist attraction. A visit includes an undergound tour led by one of the entertaining miners, an audiovisual simulation of mining techniques and a museum. One hundred meters below ground, visitors equipped with safety helmets and cap-lamps will see what life was really like for generations of South Wales’ miners. Please note that the underground tour is often closed in January for refurbishment, the surface tours however are always open. Free.

Big Pit – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Science – Properties and changes of materials: compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets; explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning.
Geography – human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.
History – a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

 

Caerleon – the Romans

The Romans colonised Wales extensively from AD74 until AD300. A large garrison was established at Caerleon (Isca). Subsequent archaeological excavation has revealed an amphitheatre, barracks and baths. The visit includes the baths, amphitheatre and the Roman Legionary Museum. There are work sheets available.  There may be a charge for some sessions that are only run on certain dates. Please see their website for further information http://museumwales.ac.uk/roman/learning/ks2/

Caerleon – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Geography – Human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.
History – the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain.

 

Castles

Over the centuries the Welsh and the English built many castles along the border to try and control the region. We offer this as a half day activity and you have two castles to choose from:

  • Raglan Castle gives a historical perspective from the early Normans through to the English Civil War. The students explore the castle, role playing different aspects of castle life. The castle allows free educational visits but the visit must be booked by the school, not Pendarren, to take advantage of this.
  • Skenfrith Castle offers a chance to try some photo orienteering in a fantastic historical setting, where the students explore the castle looking to match photographs to their maps as a competition.

 

Castles – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Design & Technology – apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.
GeographyHuman geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.
History – a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

 

Welsh Folk Museum – St Fagans

This visit provides a fascinating insight into the customs and life-styles of the people of Wales through the ages. The indoor exhibits include an agricultural section and a magnificent collection of material culture. The external exhibits show the development of housing and crafts in rural Wales, with many buildings including farm houses, watermill, tannery, chapel and school, reconstructed and furnished as they were in their period. It is possible to arrange a “Victorian Lesson” with the children dressed in costume in the school. There are also opportunities for “hands on” experiences in the reconstructed Celtic village, making wattle and daub, spinning etc. Schools wishing to use either of these re-enactments will be sent additional information about the requirements for successful role-play. Entrance is free, as are certain sections of the museum, but some sessions are charged for. For more details click here and also see their website for more information:

http://www.museumwales.ac.uk/stfagans/learning/ks2/

 

Welsh Folk Museum – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Geography – Human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.
History – a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

 

Making Maps

The small village of Llangenny provides an excellent area for map-making. The pupils are given a simple base map of the village and its surrounds and are required to complete the map by plotting the location of the houses, church, phone box, old school and other features. They will be asked to make a suitable key and there is an option to measure and calculate the scale. Trundle wheels, tapes etc. are provided by the centre.

Making Maps – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Maths – Measurement: convert between different units of metric measure (for example, kilometre and metre; centimetre and metre; centimetre and millimetre; gram and kilogram; litre and millilitre); convert between miles and kilometres; understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints (distances greater than metres are difficult in school, so ideas of kilometre and miles to see etc).
Science – Working scientifically: taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate.
Art & Design – to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay].
Geography – use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team.

 

Abergavenny Town Trail

This trail takes the pupils around the nearby market town of Abergavenny. Many of the interesting features of the town, its castle, old cattle market, tithe barn and buildings from a variety of architectural periods are included in the trail. The compactness of the town centre shopping area makes for an ideal contrast with the pupils own local environment in Haringey.

Abergavenny Town Trail – Curriculum
English – Spoken language, give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Art & Design Pupils should be taught: about great artists, architects and designers in history.
Geography Place knowledge – understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America.
History Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age, the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain, Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots, the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor, a local history study.
A Walk Along the Grwyne

The River Grwyne is the stream on our doorstep. The route follows the river along its wooded valley passing Pendarren and Llangenny and the sites of three watermills. There is a simplified map to enable the students to do the route finding.

A Walk Along The Grwyne – Curriculum
English – Spoken language:, give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Maths – Measurement: convert between different units of metric measure (for example, kilometre and metre; centimetre and metre; centimetre and millimetre; gram and kilogram; litre and millilitre); convert between miles and kilometres; understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints (distances greater than metres are difficult in school, so ideas of kilometre and miles to see etc).
Science – Working scientifically: taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate.  Living things and their habitats: describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals.  Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.  Evolution and inheritance: identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.  Light: use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.

 

A Walk Around Crickhowell

Explore the old town of Hywell’s Castle and its environs. The walk passes an old port, the ruins of a Norman Castle and the old 13 arch bridge across the River Usk. The canal is followed from Gilwern Wharf to Llangattock passing along peaceful wooded areas before returning across the valley to Crickhowell.

A Walk Around Crickhowell – Curriculum
English – Spoken language:, give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Maths – Measurement: convert between different units of metric measure (for example, kilometre and metre; centimetre and metre; centimetre and millimetre; gram and kilogram; litre and millilitre); convert between miles and kilometres; understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints (distances greater than metres are difficult in school, so ideas of kilometre and miles to see etc).
Science – Working scientifically: taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate.  Living things and their habitats: describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals.  Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.  Evolution and inheritance: identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.  Light: use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.

 

Coastal day

A day visit to visit Caswell Bay on the unspoilt Gower Coast. There is usually a short clifftop walk to the sandy beach with the opportunity to observe various coastal landforms and their specialised plant life, and sometimes seals bobbing about in the sea. On the shore the children investigate the wide variety of shore and rock pool life such as crabs and starfish. Weather permitting, there will be opportunity for beach games and a swim/paddle in the sea.

Coastal day – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Science – Working scientifically: taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate.Living things and their habitats: describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird; describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals.Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.Earth and space: describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth; describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies; use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.Evolution and inheritance: identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.
Geography – name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team

 

Stream study : Go With The Flow – data collection

This half day activity provides a number of options to study a local stream:- pupils can make predictions and then use tape measures, stop watches, meter rulers to investigate the speed, depth and width of the stream. Pupils can display their results in charts and diagrams.

Go With The Flow – Curriculum
English -Spoken language, give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Maths – Statistics: solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line graph, complete, read and interpret information in tables, including timetables: interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems calculate and interpret the mean as an average.
Stream study: Water mini-beasts – ecology

The stream supports a diverse community of invertebrates which are easily captured. Pupils can collect these invertebrates and use simple dichotomous keys and data sheets to identify their bugs, draw simple food chains and pyramids and identify adaptations to the environment. Half day.

Water Mini-beasts – Curriculum
English – Spoken language: give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings.
Maths – Statistics: complete, read and interpret information in tables, including timetables; interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems; calculate and interpret the mean as an average.
Science – Working scientifically: taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate.
Living things and their habitats: describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird; describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals.  Animals including humans: recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.  Evolution and inheritance: identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.
PE – take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team.